4 minutes with… J. Larry Cox, President, Green Diesel & Electric

imgresTell us about your company and it’s role in the Advanced Bioeconomy.

We sell and develop renewable fuel and electric plants. Our focus at this point is renewable ultra low sulfur diesel derived from cellulosic material including plastics.

Tell us about your role and what you are focused on in the next 12 months.

Our focus is to develop and promote renewable fuels around the globe. We produce a high grade ultra low sulfur “drop-in” diesel fuel at prices below $2.00 USD per gallon, or $0.52 USD per liter.

A greater focus is to develop these plants using Construction and Demolition waste, or MSW. We have the technology, and are currently looking for sites, or partners, to successfully implement it. This will obviously have a huge impact in areas such as the Caribbean, and areas where landfill reduction is necessary.

We offer cheap renewable diesel fuel along with soil enhancing “biochar”, and even water. We provide everything to make communities and the earth better.

What do you feel are the most important milestones the industry must achieve in the next 5 years?  

We must achieve economically efficient technologies, and access to capital to encourage even newer technologies

If you could snap your fingers and change one thing about the Advanced Bioeconomy, what would you change? 

The Advance Bioeconomy definitely needs access to more capital. It is very difficult today to get to full commercialization without having a champion on your side, and those are hard to find. The politics needs to change as well. There are many mandates for clean energy, but there is little help in making those mandates happen.

Of all the reasons that influenced you to join the Advanced Bioeconomy industry, what single reason stands out for you as still being compelling and important to you?  

I see this as an exciting new field. It not only will result in some good things for our Mother Earth, but I see a lot of economic opportunity as well. Economic opportunity for the producers, but also for communities in the creation of new jobs and cheaper energy. All communities need access to energy to increase their wellbeing.

Where are you from? 

Knoxville, TN USA

What was your undergraduate major in college, and where did you attend? Why did you choose that school and that pathway?

B.S. Industrial Management – University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Who do you consider your mentors – could be personal, business, or just people you have read about and admire. What have you learned from them?

Even though I am not a Democrat, I really admire Franklin D, Roosevelt. I feel he had a real compassion for people.

What’s the biggest lesson you ever learned during a period of adversity?  

Don’t dwell on yesterday, and work harder today.

What hobbies do you pursue, away from your work in the industry?

Outdoor activities

What books or articles are on your reading list right now, or you just completed and really enjoyed?  

Lee Childs’ Jack Reacher series.

Central America Data Express

Biomass Magazine

This entry was posted in Biodiesel Report. Bookmark the permalink.